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Re: Typos

Posted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:50 pm
by Arielle
There are two spelling for the River (And village?) Tarendelle? Sometimes spelled Tarendrelle and sometimes Tarendelle and once Tarnendelle.

The Gravelled Lane
The small gravelled lane continues east and west. A small village is visible
off in the distance eastward. Closer at hand are scattered farms and various
crop fields such as wheat, barley and tabac. To the west the lane becomes
rougher as it crosses uncultivated fields of tall dry grass dotted with
grazing herds. A ways to the north the dark line of a forest can be seen
where it ends on the north bank of the Tarendrelle river.
[ obvious exits: N E S ]

The Bank of the Tarendrelle
Thick stands of willow and birch cover both banks of the Tarendrelle River.
Called simply the Taren further west, it is broad and swift, impossible to
cross in the region as it tumbles and churns on its journey east to join
the Eldar River. To the east the banks have been cleared and planted with
wheat by some nearby farmers. South stretch empty fields dotted with
scattered herds of sheep. A small landing juts into the river, its planking
nearly awash in the waters.
[ obvious exits: E S ]

Wandering Forest Path
You wander along a narrow winding path that almost disappears among the
underbrush as it weaves its way through a forest dominated by thick stands
of old oak and tall fir, with lighter patches of leatherleaf and ash mixed
here and there. From somewhere to the south can be heard the muffled roar
of the Tarendelle River.
[ obvious exits: E W ]

Old Clearing
You stand in the midst of a clearing that was once the yard of a nearby cabin.
This yard is now covered with scrub and tall rank weeds, the remains of rusty
tools poking above the ground in places. The cabin itself is dilapidated, the
roof half gone and the walls sagging outwards. A rutted and worn track passes
by to the west and north of here, while to the south can be heard the muted
roar of the mighty Tarendelle River rushing along below its banks.
[ obvious exits: N E S W ]

Along the Bridle Track
The track turns north again, leaving the bank of the Tarnendelle river to the
south. Though muffled by the river's high banks, the water's loud rushing can
still fills the air with its roar. About the banks grow thick stands of
willow and birch, surrounded by a forest of oak, ash and leatherleaf. Directly
east of here is a small clearing, tall rank weeds now covering the ground,
beyond which can be seen a dilapidated old cabin.
[ obvious exits: N E W ]

Track Alongside the River
Having crossed over the Tarendelle to the south, the bridle track here now
turns east to follow the mighty river's north bank briefly, before turning
north again. The muffled roar of the rushing waters can be clearly heard
below the banks, which are covered thickly with willow and birch. A thick
patch of briars blocks the view westward, but in the other directions stretch
endless lines of oak, ash and leatherleaf forest.
[ obvious exits: E S ]

Bridge Over the Tarendelle
Here the track coming from a village visable across the river to the south
crosses over the Tarendelle by means of a stout arched bridges made from
heavy oaken timbers. The track then turns east following the northern bank.
The air is filled with the throaty roar of the churning waters beneath you,
as they rush eastward to join the Eldar River. Willows and birch grow thickly
on both high banks, while a forest of oak, ash and leatherleaf can be seen
beyond.
[ obvious exits: N S ]

Ely edit:

That whole area is a mess, mentioning the Eldar, Tarendrelle and Manetherendrelle rivers. It even can't get the names right in the zone description room, so...

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 11:40 am
by iria
Lelaine Akashi says 'One of our own's daughters is getting married

Could be my english grammar is not entirely on point but shouldn't it be "daughters are getting married" or "daughter is getting married" ?

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:31 pm
by Ashlee
iria wrote:Lelaine Akashi says 'One of our own's daughters is getting married

Could be my english grammar is not entirely on point but shouldn't it be "daughters are getting married" or "daughter is getting married" ?


It is correct. The “is” refers to one, which is singular, not daughters. For the purpose of subject-verb agreement, you almost always disregard the noun that is included in the prepositional phrase.

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:45 pm
by isabel
Ashlee wrote:
iria wrote:Lelaine Akashi says 'One of our own's daughters is getting married

Could be my english grammar is not entirely on point but shouldn't it be "daughters are getting married" or "daughter is getting married" ?


It is correct. The “is” refers to one, which is singular, not daughters. For the purpose of subject-verb agreement, you almost always disregard the noun that is included in the prepositional phrase.


No I believe Iria is correct, because the subject here isn't 'One of our own' (singular), it is 'daughter/s'
If you ask 'Who is getting married?' It won't be 'One of our own' - it would be 'the daughter/s'

edit: Unless the sentence is 'One of our own daughters' and the 's is a typo. With the apostrophe it sounds like they're saying One of our own people's daughter/s.

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:45 pm
by Elysia
Isn't is just like "one of my friend's daughters is getting married"? Same principle, right?

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:50 pm
by iria
Hrm sounds weird to my foreign ears in any case.

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:04 pm
by Palaemon
Elysia wrote:Isn't is just like "one of my friend's daughters is getting married"? Same principle, right?


Yes. It is correct as written.

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:33 pm
by Raeza
No, it should be "One of our own's daughter is getting married."

The meaning here is that the daughter of a person who is part of our group is getting married. "One of our own" is a single noun phrase denoting the parent, so we could replace "one of our own", for instance, with "Mary". It would then be "Mary's daughter is getting married," not "Mary's daughters is getting married."

It is not the same as "one of my friend's daughters is getting married" because that actually means that my friend has multiple daughters and one of those daughters is getting married. In that case, "one" refers to one of the (multiple) daughters, and "one of my friend" is not a single unit (noun phrase). This is different than "One of our own", where "one" is selecting from "our own" (i.e. a person from our group), not from multiple daughters.

I think the reason it sort of sounds correct until you examine it closely is due to analogy with other sentences that are correct, but in fact have different structures, such as "One of our daughters is getting married" and Elysia's "One of our friend's daughters is getting married." But again, in both of these cases, "one" is referring to one of multiple daughters whereas in the original sentence, it is picking out the parent of the daughter rather than the daughter herself.

(Sorry -- probably more of a technical explanation that you might have been hoping for, but I'm a linguist in my day job.)

Re: Typos

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 11:16 pm
by Reyne
I had to read it a couple times but yeah I'ma throw my hat in on Raeza's side. Either way it seems that the phrasing is confusing enough that if you were going to bother editing it you might as well change the wording to make it clearer in general.

However, perhaps not technically a typo since not every person in the world will have grammatically perfect English. I might very well have said it like the NPC does and if someone said it to me I'd get it. Wouldn't expect everyone to have identical diction anyway.

Re: Typos

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:30 pm
by Angkar
Malkieri Court
Contrasting the dirt roads that lead to and around the heart of LockShear, the
court-like area surrounding the town hall is paved with interlocking flat
stones. To the south the hall itself looms over the smaller buildings of the
village proper.
[ obvious exits: E W ]



Should read as below.

Inside the North Gate of Lockshear
Tall wooden logs are driven side-by-side into the ground to the east and west
of this spot to form the north wall of Lockshear's only line of defense. A
swinging gate, crafted of the wood and reinforced with iron bands, provides
access through the palisade's walls for the busy villagers. The livestock
entrance to Lockshear's stockyard lies to the south while the avenue stretches
to the east and west.
[ obvious exits: N E S W ]